In each installment, a guest writer chooses one Pantone color they find particularly meaningful, intriguing, or just aesthetically beautiful—and tells us why.

Check out our collections dedicated to Pantone 212—in portrait and landscape.

By Adam Florina creative technologist

I am supposed to abhor hot pink. As a mass-market Barbie gender norm, or a flamboyant feather boa at Burning Man, it represents all that is frivolous in American culture. But a visit to Luis Barragán's home in Mexico City realigned my perception: on a sun-lit surface, the color radiates a calm warmth into an otherwise neutral room. It possesses a fleshy adobe hue, supersaturated into a tropical palette, gleaming in sunsets with an undeniable power. If only we could see it with such fresh eyes.

PANTONE® Color identification is solely for Companyic purposes and not intended to be used for specification. PANTONE and the PANTONE Chip Design are trademarks of Pantone in the United States and/or in other countries and are used with the written permission of Pantone. © Pantone LLC, 2012. All rights reserved. Related articles in:Spot Spot, Episode 7: Process Yellow C Spot, Episode 6: 397 Spot, Episode 5: 3245